M At The Doctor

Screening for colon cancer

Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumor that develops from the lining of the colon (or large intestine), or rectum. By screening, that is to say by detecting a cancer (quite often at an early stage), the chances of recovery increase sharply, and the proposed treatments are less heavy.

When cancer is diagnosed at stage 1 (that is, at a very early stage), the chances of recovery increase dramatically.

The people concerned

After age 50, the risk of being affected by the disease increases; also for men and women, screening is recommended every two years and up to 74 years of age.

This approach aims to detect, at the earliest, in the absence of symptoms, lesions likely to be cancerous or evolve to cancer. Screening can be done in two ways: as part of a program organized by the health authorities, or as part of an individual approach by the doctor or the patient.

Specific screening


Some people are more at risk for colon cancer than others. In these, a specific screening must be set up. The gastroenterologist recommends special supervision at home before the age of 50:

  • If in the family, a relative has been diagnosed with colorectal cancer before the age of 65 or if both parents have had it,
  • If you suffer, or if you have suffered from a chronic inflammatory disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease),
  • If you have already had a first colorectal cancer or an adenoma of more than one centimeter,
  • If you are part of a family with Lynch Syndrome or Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP).

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